China and the United States cult brand Babyghost bow

what happened: After 12 years, American-Chinese streetwear brand Babyghost announced that it would stop trading. The cult sign, co-founded by American Josh Hopper and Qiaoran Huang of Weifang, Shandong, in 2010 was synonymous with street style and the flourishing of the new hybrid Chinese identity. A recent Instagram post stated that the company will begin “cleaning up the inventory of its Tmall and Taobao stores,” after which it will close. The reasons for this were not disclosed but it was described as a “very difficult decision”.

Babyghost, a cult brand, founded by American Josh Hopper and Qiaoran Huang in 2010 from Weifang City, Shandong, has been synonymous with street style and the flourishing of the new hybrid Chinese identity. Photo: Weibo

Take Jing: Babyghost was a designation for many early adopters. Originally founded on the premise that it could resonate authentically in China as well as the West, it has continued to be a font with universal appeal – not just an inscription of Eastern and Western tastes and aesthetics. He was one of the first designer names to be launched on Alibaba, and he pioneered a wave of “Taobao” players who challenged the local industry’s concept of fashion; It went on to gain 400,000 fans on the platform.

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Babyghost has seen his clothes organically worn all over the world: by models such as the brand’s muse and stylist, Zhou Xiaowen, superstar Liu Wen, and many more. Image courtesy of Babyghost

The duo understood very well the power of early social platforms. Growing the community through disparate images, simulations, and video, Babyghost has seen his clothes being worn organically all over the world: by supermodels such as fashion designer and model, Ju Xiao Wen, superstar Liu Wen, and many more. It was one of the first companies to open a live store on Tmall which, once again, brought it up and put it ahead of the curve. In 2016, running simultaneously between New York and Shanghai, its slanted presentation of bland breakfast was broadcast via Weibo, bringing cities and audiences together — long before the pandemic.

Babyghost not only united professional fashionistas half a world away, but represented strangers. And if you know them, then you know, as they say. It is sad that it is over. But it is better to burn than to fade.

take jing Reports on a piece of groundbreaking news and presents our editorial team’s analysis of the key impacts on the luxury industry. In the recurring column, we analyze everything from product drops and mergers to the heated controversy that has gone viral on Chinese social media.

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