Chronicle of events: Social ice cream – world-famous ice cream

Chronicle of events: Social ice cream – world-famous ice cream



Karima Berkey is in Penn State, close to Pennsylvania State University itself. >> The university started in 1555, we started in 1865. More than 157 years. In 1865, we began to get out of the barn. We were part of HAYLOFT and BLACKSMITH SHOP. The barn is in the place where the old main part is now. Ryan: Through its rich tradition, one of CREAMERY’s landmarks has become the cow for the cone concept. >> CREAMERY is a complex website. A lot of people think it’s what you see here, the store. But we are a diverse process. Ryan: All the processes are incomplete here in Penn State. Twice a week, raw milk from the campus dairy barns is delivered to cream and then processed. Then comes the freeze. >> That’s 35 below. Ryan: Finally, it’s a matter of four days from cow to cone. Cream not only creates ice cream, it teaches it as well. Assisting the Department of Food Science at PENN STATE with the instruction of the revamped short course, an educational program on the ingredients and outputs of ice cream manufacturing. The ornate roster of former students of the short course includes the likes of Ben and Jerry’s, BASKIN ROBBINS, DAIRY QUEEN, and HAAGEN-DAAZ. And in Pittsburgh, the lessons learned in PENN STATE CREAMERY come live every day at KLAVON’S. Entering KLAVON’s in the strip area is like stepping into the 1920s. It opened in 1923 when KLAVON opened as a pharmacy next door, while also operating as a soda fountain and selling Benny candy. The business closed in 1979, but in 1999 the KLAVON family reopened it as an ice cream shop, preserving its originality that is still in effect today. Marble counter, stainless steel fountain equipment, stool, and telephone booths. >> I was blown away when I walked through the door. THE WOODWORK, THE ART DECO. It is beautiful when you enter. Ryan: That was Maya Johnson’s impression when she was a client. She is now the general manager here, a position she has held for nearly a decade. >> I grew up in the hill area. Ryan: Maya is the original drilling tower that prides itself on perfecting the rich Clavon tradition, and making sure its history is passed down. >> I also make sure all new employees know the history. I let them know the history, so they could know what they were going to say, how to tell people the history of the place. Ryan: When you’re not teaching and serving customers behind the counter, Maya is busy behind the scenes, making ice cream. >> I put a lot of love in my ice cream. The flavors I make, salted caramel paste, I’m not going to skip anything. It’s going to be delicious, you get fat and sugars when I make ice cream. [LAUGHTER] Ryan: I learned the multi-layer process while attending an ice cream short course at Penn State University. >> You want the consistency to be just right. Not very icy. You want the milk to be the right temperature. It’s a lot you have to go through to get a really good ice cream. Ryan: Maya loves to challenge everything too. Try new flavors and incorporate their creativity. >> I made sweet potato pie ice cream, I made banana cream pie ice cream. Ryan: Maya’s new complements to old KLAVON favorites as they are, in their own way, continue to add history to this area staple.

Chronicle of events: Social ice cream – world-famous ice cream

Just a few hours outside of Pittsburgh is a unique ice cream operation that the entire Commonwealth hails as among the best. We’re talking about Penn State Creamery: a place that’s earned national ice cream recognition. Cream has also influenced many of the popular ice cream brands you see on store shelves today.

Just a few hours outside of Pittsburgh is this one-of-a-kind ice cream operation that the entire Commonwealth hails as among the best.

We’re talking about Penn State Creamery: a place that has won national recognition for its ice cream and has also influenced many of the popular ice cream brands you see on store shelves today.

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