Classic Creme Brulee – CSMonitor.com

I rarely make creme brulee. For one thing, it’s hard to make for just one person unless you’re only going to take a fraction of all the ingredients to make one meal. Do you know how difficult it is to measure half the yolk of an egg? I would only take one serving if it was just for me because no one should eat two double servings of creme brulee. Not if she wants to get dressed the next day.

But I had friends for dinner and one of the ordered desserts was creme brulee. Since I haven’t done this in a long time, I thought it was best to test a recipe the week before dinner to make sure I could do it right. How embarrassing would it be if I spoiled the candy?

Most creme brulee recipes are very simple. Heat the cream, marinate with vanilla pods, beat the yolks with sugar, dilute the mixture in hot cream, pour the mixture into ramekins, bake in a water bath. Seriously, it’s that easy, but what’s not so easy is measuring when you’re done. If you overcook creme brulee, it will be scrambled eggs. If it’s not cooked well, instead of a soft custard, it will be runny and dry and it won’t be pleasant to eat. To see if it’s done, you’re supposed to shake it and see if the middle is still vibrating but not too vibrating.

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