Pasta and crudo restaurants are everywhere. This bustling spot in the sixth shows us why

newly, Jen Agg, a restaurant owner in Toronto tweeted Something so brief and deadly sharp, it was like a sashimi knife straight to the heart. I’ve written a list of what “every restaurant right now” seems to have their menu model, including roasted carrots, beet salad, crudo, and “Casio e Pepe (many variations)”. “Every restaurant” means the culinary chill of 21st century North America, of which we certainly have a large number in the Bay Area.

It seems like you can’t throw in a golden beet in San Francisco without hitting a pasta spot that promises to be different from all the other pasta places, and Eteria is definitely one of them. Out of my head, I can name a few counterpart establishments, both new and not so new, where you can eat pasta and raw fish: Penny Roma, One Fish Raw Bar, Picco, Daytrip, for example. Popular in Italian coastal cities and popularized in the U.S. by Dave Pasternack in the now-closed Esca of New York, Crudo has been a longstanding preoccupation among Bay Area chefs, from Michael Mina to Pearl 6101’s Mel Lopez. Established as a restaurant specializing in handmade pasta and vegetables, Itria excels in its small niche that has been carved for itself in the culinary moment.

I’ve written a few small notes about Itria over the past year, after watching the partnership between former Al’s Place, Cotogna chef Daniel Evers, and restaurateur Min Park slowly transform from an impromptu pizza delivery into the whole-pasta hot spot it is now. From the start, Evers’ real scheme has been omakasvi noodles. To give a chance to snack on several types of pasta in one sitting, although gluten certainly occupies the stomach quite differently from raw fish and rice.


Tuna rice in Itria at SF


Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

Local trout in pea sauce in Etria.

Local trout in pea sauce in Etria.


Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle


Top image: Clockwise from far right: tuna tartare, casunchilli, mavaldin, panna cotta, and yellow amberjack at Sour in Atria in San Francisco. By Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

If you want to experience the very best that the restaurant does, go for the pasta and crudo tasting menu, which is six courses for $85 per person.

You’ll be able to try several of the restaurant’s raw and raw dishes at once, and that alone makes the tasting worth it. (I am including the a la carte prices just for your information.) Raw fish – how hard is that, right? But as I ate, I marveled at the hard work these dishes involved in.

The local trout ($13) was a picture of spring, drizzled in a stunning green sweet pea vinaigrette. Little rhubarb lozenges, like butterflies’ napkins, added pops of their delightful tartness to every bite.

Another species worth writing about is Saor’s yellow-tailed ambergris ($13), named after a Venetian fish preservation technique that uses vinegar, wine, and melted onions. Its sweet and sour flavors convey the irresistible strength of Italian agrodolce, and delicate sliced ​​red onions and onion flowers give it a full-circle feel. A historical favorite of sailors, this style made its way to Japan, where it’s known as nanbanzuke – which you can loosely translate as “barbarian marinade.”

Bana Cotta in Itria in SF

Bana Cotta in Itria in SF


Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

Spaghetti, smoked octopus, red onion and chile at Atria in San Francisco

Spaghetti, smoked octopus, red onion and chile at Atria in San Francisco


Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle


The delicious sour cream panna cotta, top left, is a dessert that resets the palate. Spicy spaghetti, above right, is topped with a red sauce of chili and red onion and studded with smoked octopus. Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle photos

I’d also highly recommend going for the wine pairing ($45), with selections from a compelling menu put together by General Manager and Wine Manager Julie Mackay, who also worked at Al’s Place previously. It tarnishes Italian, of course, and natural wine nerds will find plenty to love here.

A restaurant that embraces omakase-style service is a short menu of sake, a rare find in Italian restaurants. For example, Matsuno Kotobuki Honjozo ($15 per cup), a light-bodied drink with hints of burnt caramel, is an exceptional accompaniment to the equally formidable Evers Tuna ($12), the sumptuous fish raised by smoked leeks, egg yolk and toppings. Crispy roasted hazelnuts.

The pasta menu moves around a bit, with offbeat variations like chip-shaped cencioni and potato-stuffed triangoli ($23), a transparently sarcastic nod to a chip lover like myself. (I couldn’t stop eating them.)

But of course we need to treat the cacio e pepe in the room. Evers’ delivery is technically cacio e uova ($23), the simple formula enhanced by the addition of scrambled eggs. The silky, creamy sauce clings to countless waves of mottled Mavaldin noodles, and a hefty dose of ground black pepper reminds you why this dish thrives on the power of its properties. There’s nowhere to hide in a dish that simple, and sorts does it right.

Crispy Mavaldin noodles topped in a creamy sauce with a generous dose of ground black pepper in Etria in SF

Crispy Mavaldin noodles topped in a creamy sauce with a generous dose of ground black pepper in Etria in SF

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

One important thing to note is that if you get the tasting menu, you will likely receive some off-menu items as well. Once upon a time, I was delighted to have a bowl of spicy spaghetti topped with a red sauce of chili and red onions and studded with pork chops from smoked octopus. It had a strange taste of Amatriceana pasta, which usually includes gummali, but it was much lighter with no pork fat. This was a welcome contrast, considering how much pasta one could fit in during the night.

The desserts are simple and refreshing, with the usual tasting menu being a delicious panna cotta sour cream ($12). After all those carbs, panna cotta resets the palate; It’s not a bad way to get back into the busy Mission Street environment.

You might be wondering, what about the rest of the a la carte menu? There are a couple of family-style dishes to share, like the fried chicken ($38) with Italian chili sauce. Inside the larger canon of fried chicken dishes out there, it was just as good. Acceptable. yes. In essence, a little dry. If you feel choice anxiety about it, don’t do it.

Same thing with appetizers. Who doesn’t love crunchy pork belly ($18), especially when paired with pickled green tomatoes and musky black garlic, like here? But it’s not a smart introduction if you’re saving yourself for pasta, so I’d skip that unless you plan on focusing on the latter.

Julie Mackay, Eteria Wine Director, offers a bottle of wine to diners at the San Francisco restaurant.

Julie Mackay, Eteria Wine Director, offers a bottle of wine to diners at the San Francisco restaurant.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

The Venetian-style restaurant space seems to combine two concepts into one. Up front, there’s a bar with high tables and mood lighting; Outside, a bright dining room with a stocked wooden common table in its centre. The staff responsible for the house connect the spaces like trains going from one station to another. Under Mackay’s leadership, they keep the experience fun and casual, whether you grab a glass of wine and pasta at the bar or go for their full tasting menu.

I’m still thinking about the hilarious smash hit of restaurant homogeneity (which she admitted included her own) as I write this. It is true that in times of economic crisis, cultural expression may be less empirical and more for the sake of results, because it is not safe to take risks. You go for the beet salad and cacio e pepe because they enhance the end result, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Overall, Itria is a great case study of how a place can use the familiar to create an exceptional experience. It’s all in the restaurant’s attention to minute detail – through the precision of the rhubarb cut, the thoughtfulness of its wine list and the pasta decorations.

3266 24th Street, San Francisco. 415-874-9821 or www.itriasf.com

hours: 5:30 – 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; 5:30-10pm on Friday and Saturday.

Accessibility: Flat space, no steps. Good access to tables and seating in the bar.

noise level: Loud, with difficult conversation at peak hours.

Meal for two without drinks: $90 – $170.

What to ask: Tasting menu, Yellowtail rice, Casio Ivo.

Meat Free Options: Lots in the appetizer and pasta sections.

drinks: Beer and wine.

Transportation: Steps from the 24th Street station. On the 14th, 27th, 48th, 49th and 67th Muni Lines. Difficult street parking, but close to many public garages.

best practices: The tasting menu, as well as the wine pairing, are excellent offerings. Reservations are recommended.



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